Category Archives: Video Testimonials

3 Tips Every Doctor Should Know to Create Great Video

I had the pleasure of speaking at The Aesthetic Meeting 2015 in Montreal (ASAPS) last month. This event is a gathering of aesthetic plastic surgeons from around the world.

In this video clip, I talk about creating video and offer three important tips for executing your video strategy: when to OWN your content, why it's critical to BE authentic, and tips to PLAN in less time, before you execute.

OWN IT

When you own your video content, you'll be able to leverage it across all of your marketing tactics from newsletter emails to your YouTube channel. If a potential patient finds your video online, they should be able to click through to your website, not your videographer's site or to a competitor's video on the same topic.  Sometimes it makes sense to co-brand and create videos for websites like RealSelf of SnapChat but if it's content that is valuable to use in other aspects of your marketing, we strongly recommend investing in the production and having it for as long as you'd like.

BE IT

An authentic response and a conversational tone connects with a viewing audience much deeper than a stiff and scripted production. Some of the most powerful videos with doctors and dentists are when they forget about the camera and speak to an interviewer about their work. In this format, their knowledge, expertise, passion, and personality are much more likely to resonate with potential patients.  So ditch the scripts and teleprompters and work with someone who can make sure you are as fabulous on camera as you are off.

PLAN IT

Carefully consider your objective in creating videos. Do you want to educate? Become an authority in your area of specialty? Do you want to promote a specific procedure that you are passionate about? When you are particularly enthusiastic about your purpose for creating video, it shows. Another consideration when planning your videos, is to include videos about procedures that make you money! Patient testimonials are fantastic for this purpose.

Click to watch the full presentation from ASAPS.

Transcript:

The point of this is to make sure that you feel confident and are empowered enough to be able to create these videos yourself and leverage them so they are easily part of every other piece of your marketing channel.

OWN it So one of the first pieces for "create" is to OWN it. Honestly, the thing that makes me want to call every doctor when I watch their video is the fact that if I click their video and it goes to their videographers channel on YouTube or it goes to another company. Unless you have a strict co-branding strategy where that is part of your plan, that's great. But, if you're creating video and you're investing in that video, I strongly suggest that it lives on your own YouTube channel so you have the opportunity to leverage it as well. I always use the analogy, would you rather own a home in an upcoming neighborhood or would you rather rent? If you're owning that house and investing in it, you can do the nicest stuff, you can do the upgrades and 10 years down the road, it's still yours. Versus if you are leasing it or renting it, you just have to pay the price that goes up. So do it well, do it once, and build on that foundation.

BE it Number 2, I've heard this from many of my colleagues. I did talk to RealSelf about video and they confirmed this, too, being authentic, being conversational, educational, telling a story that is real instead of staged or with a teleprompter is what people want. And not only that, they can see through a lot of the other stuff so throw out the teleprompter or don't pay extra for the teleprompter. Rather, have somebody interview you. I find that that is one of the most effective ways that we can truly get the nature and the personality of the doctor or the testimonial or the patient - is to have a conversation with them. Because they forget the camera is on them and they are more open to really tell the true story. And for you, you know the answers to many of these questions. You do this every day, you talk about it every day. There's nothing different than you talking to a camera pretending that that camera is a patient and when you're answering those questions imagining them there, it will matter. Because guess what's on the other side of that: that potential patient. So BE it.

The last piece. We want to OWN it, we want to BE it, and then the last piece is to PLAN it.

PLAN it I'm not talking about the 4-week planning session I had to do in Oregon for my 2 commercials, but really have a good idea of what it is you want to accomplish. Do you want to accomplish some educational videos? What are those videos? When I work with clients, we like to make sure that people think about what procedures do they love the most. If you are just getting started in video, think about the procedures that you love the most. Educate them on that, because what will happen is you will be able to 1) promote yourself or educate more people in the procedure that you love and you will get more awareness and branding there, and 2) you will also get a sense of how to have that enthusiasm as you are speaking on camera. When you are talking about something that you love, it will come out more naturally and it will be a great starting place for you as you continue with video.

And then the second piece, of course, is what are the procedures that make you money. And those are the videos that you want out there as well. Not only educational videos, but testimonials.

So OWN it, BE it, PLAN it.

Lights, Camera, Action? Tips for a Great Experience In Front of the Camera

Whether you’re a business executive or a medical professional, the expectation is that you perform well in person and on camera. You’re an expert! You know your material inside and out. But even the best of us experience anxiety when the director calls, “Action!” 

We recently sat down with Jenna Lange and Maria Iams of Lange International to discuss tips and techniques for effective messaging with video. Lange International is a high-stakes communications consulting group who works with some of the biggest companies in the U.S. preparing executives for speeches, presentations, video shoots, and much more.

In this video, Jenna and Maria describe their Three Pillars of Communication to prepare you for your day in front of the camera:

Know Your Audience – Think about who is watching your video. Where are they watching from? What time of day is it likely to be? What might they have been doing just prior? These questions can really drive what you say and how you say it. Plus, you’re more likely to appear at ease in your conversation when you know who you are talking to.

Know Your Key Messages – A concise message is more likely to resonate. Think about the top three things you would like to communicate. Emblazon these topics on your brain so that, if you start on a tangent or forget your train of thought, you can quickly get back to the message you intended to deliver.

Rehearse – Maria reminded us that rehearsing in your head does NOT equal practicing in front of the camera, out loud. A helpful tip she provided is to memorize your first one or two lines. Typically, when you know your topic (your business!), the rest will flow and you’ll avoid looking scripted and disingenuous. When you rehearse, think about your tone of voice, making eye contact, and using appropriate gestures for emphasis. Body language is as important as what you are saying.

Have other questions about how to prepare to be on camera?  Let us know!

Watch our video or read the transcript below:

Jen: Hi, I'm Jen Longtin, founder and CEO of HD Medical Marketing. Today, I have the pleasure of having Maria and Jenna here. Jenna is the founder of Lange International. They are both high-stakes consultants and coaches for executives. It's critical for all of us to find comfort in front of the camera. So today what we'd like to do is just talk to Jenna and Maria and get some tips on ways that everyone can feel comfortable and confident answering questions and connecting with their audience. So welcome, thank you so much for being here. Jenna, if it's alright, I'd love if you would maybe just tell us a little bit more about what you and Maria do for your clients.
Jenna: Absolutely. So we are consultants and coaches in the area of high stakes communication and what that means is when there's a lot riding on what you say and how you say it, the video environment is a classic example of that, lots of people watching you, lots at stake, and you have to perform your best.
Jen: What are some of the most common fears that people have when you start working with them?
Jenna: They're very afraid of speaking. There's a lot riding on what they say. Groups come to us as well because they want to be more persuasive with their messaging.
Jen: What are three tips that you recommend for any professional or anyone getting on camera? What do you recommend they do before that red light goes on?
Jenna: So something that helps, particularly on film, is practicing the questions that you're going to get and then establishing pillars for the response. So you ask me, what are the top three things we need to think about: Know Your Audience, Know Your Key Messages, Rehearse. I've got three pillars and now I can elaborate on any one of those if I choose to. So for example, Know Your Audience. Questions we like to ask are, "How do they feel as they are sitting there watching you? What time of day? What were they looking at right before they starting watching you and listening to your story? What really drives them?" So you ask all these questions and completely changes what you are going to say. And it makes you more comfortable to have a conversation.
Jen: It's amazing when you're looking in the camera and you're seeing that person in the camera how different the subtleties of your body language is versus if you're just trying to remember what comes next. If you're thinking about the person that you're having that conversation versus the other way around, it's subtle, but it's significant. Body language is important.
Maria: Oh, definitely.
Jenna: With Key Messages it's really about rehearsing our senior leaders. What are the top three things that you want to get across? And some of those calls take place via Skype at 9:00 at night to get them ready for that next day's meeting. What are going to say? Say it again, say it again, make it more concise, make it more relevant.
Maria: And just to piggy-back on what Jenna was saying, about know your Key Messages, it's really critical that you know those because you can always come back to them when you start to stumble and feel like you're going to forget what you were going to say.
Jenna: And then we do a lot of rehearsing.
Maria: We do a lot of rehearsing with our clients. This is often a step that people are very reluctant to engage in and even rehearsing in one's head is not the same as saying it out loud. So something that I've done a lot with clients is have them almost memorize the first two lines that are going to come out of their mouth because I find that if they have those two lines memorized, the rest just starts to flow. And, with many clients, just one in particular I'm thinking of, getting her to do it in the right tone of voice, with the most powerful eye contact, the right gestures attached to what she's going to say, it sets her up so much more to be successful for the rest of the conversation. So that's the sort of precision we're talking about when we say rehearse. You don't necessarily have to script the whole thing, but really starting off strong can help you for the rest of the presentation.
Jenna: I would say one thing we like to do is watch, just become a consumer of quality video. Become a consumer of quality speaking, great executives who command attention. So as you are thinking about this, go online and check it out, see who's highly rated. See what they do that you like and see what they do that you absolutely will never do and learn from them.
Jen: Excellent.
Maria: And do it. And practice. So do it, get on video, watch yourself, do it again, keep doing it. Same with public speaking. The more you do it, the more comfortable you'll get with it.
Jen: And I love that you have a profession where you are offering this to people because I look at speaking a lot like personal training where if you don't sign up for it, you're going to find every excuse to not do it because it's not part of your practice so to have somebody like you that can call and practice and that's what you do. It makes it easier and easier to get out there run that half marathon or whatever it is that you're training for, then it becomes actually a joy and something that you feel like you are able to extend beyond just your everyday. I love it. Well, Lange International is the business with Jenna and Maria. Thank you so much, this has been so informative. We will continue to post more tips on how to prepare for video and how to make the most of your video so that you're connecting with your audience, you are converting clients, and you are feeling good about what it is that your reputation is online. Thank you so much.

5 Tips for Great Patient Video Testimonials

 

You run a great practice, and you're good at what you do!  More than likely, you have plenty of happy patients willing to record a testimonial for you. Want compelling patient testimonials easier, faster, and cheaper? Follow these 5 tips:

1. Don’t Be Afraid to Ask
Who wants to hug you during their post-op appointments? Who has already given you a glowing review? Ask these patients if they would be willing to share their experience with others on video during their next visit. Not everyone will say yes but you'd be amazed at how many people want to tell the world how great they feel and why they recommend you. We recommend doing the interview at their NEXT appointment.

2. Make It a Routine
Asking for reviews and testimonials should be part of every doctor's marketing plan.
Commit to asking 4 patients per month if they would be willing to share their experience. Set up a filming corner, with a simple backdrop and good lighting. Establish a list of open-ended questions that elicit heartfelt responses. Finally, determine a method for quick, easy, and regular posting of your patients’ stories. YouTube, your website and TouchMD are great options.

You can use a simple camera or tablet video along with a tripod. For more ideas on video set up, subscribe to our blog.

3. Ask The Right Questions
Real patients naturally connect with viewers. Their gratitude and renewed confidence is palpable when the right questions are posed.

- How did you find us? Did a friend refer you, or did you see a positive online review about us?
- What are three words that describe life before you came to our practice? What are three words that describe it now?
- If your friends were thinking about using our practice, what would you tell them to do?

Be sure to thank your patients and get a waiver of consent. They'll leave their video shoots feeling good about what they've done and clear on where the videos will appear.

4. Build a Community of Evangelists
Satisfied patients viewing other satisfied patients on your website and your YouTube channel reinforces satisfaction! The sense of community might even compel new patients to record their unique experience as well.

5. Don’t Give In To Temptation
You might get a call from a business that can do testimonials for you with actors but do not give in to temptation. The FCC requires reasonable disclosure when someone promotes your clinic in exchange for money. Integrity matters.

Here is a recent example of a patient who not only shared from the heart but made us all laugh too: video testimonial.